Menu

Sales tax rebates continue up in SJC

By Martha Charrey
San Jacinto News-Times editor

Sales tax revenue payments for October in San Jacinto County indicate that sales tax rebates continue upward for all three incorporated cities in the county, according to the most recent report released from the office of state comptroller Glenn Hegar.

Coldspring’s rebate check amount will be $19,101.49, up by 11.58 percent from last October’s amount of $17,118.29. Payments to date for Coldspring total $226,156.63, up 4.34 percent from the prior year’s payment to date of $216.747.37.

Shepherd’s rebate check amount will be $18,530.55, up 8.46 percent from last year’s comparable payment of $17,084.29. Payments to date for Shepherd total $194,915.55, up 5.16 percent from the prior year’s payment to date of $185,344.47.

Point Blank’s net payment this period will be $4,550.68, up 30.57 percent from the comparable payment in 2015 of $3,485.00. Payments to date for Point Blank total $38,723.26, up 13.55 percent from last year’s payment to date of $34,101.32.

The county of San Jacinto collects a current 0.500 percent rate. The county will receive a rebate check in the amount of $36,968.86 for October, up 25.20 percent from last year’s comparable payment of $29,525.20. Total payments received by the county to date for 2016 amount to $353,775.62, up 7.58 percent from the same period in 2015 which was $328,841.19.

Tax rates for cities in San Jacinto are 1.500 percent for Coldspring, 1.000 percent for Point Blank and 1.500 percent for Shepherd.

Texas Comptroller Hegar said that state sales tax revenue totaled $2.29 billion in October, 0.2 percent more than in October 2015. “Opposing trends in consumer and business spending resulted in slight overall growth in state sales tax revenue,” Hegar said. “Continued declines in collections from the mining, manufacturing and wholesale trade sectors, reflecting the subdued level of drilling for oil and natural gas production, were offset by significant gains from retail trade and restaurants.”

Total sales tax revenue for the three months ending in October 2016 was down by 2.1 percent compared to the same period a year ago. Sales tax revenue is the largest source of state funding for the state budget, accounting for 58 percent of all tax collections. Motor vehicle sales and rental taxes, motor fuel taxes and oil and natural gas production taxes also are large revenue sources for the state.

In October 2016, Texas collected the following revenue from those taxes:
• motor vehicle sales and rental taxes — $396 million, down 4.6 percent from October 2015;
• motor fuels taxes — $299 million, up 2.1 percent from October 2015; and
• oil and natural gas production taxes — $224 million, down 6.9 percent from October 2015.